Timing

There is a thing here about sundials. (Again see folder in Keybase Bibliothek)

There is an artist here setting one up at Nida.

One of the things we discussed at Massia was running a workshop that aligned with plant time, rather than the Gregorian calendar. (Also something that came up as I complete my ‘review’ of Trade Markings…almost there).

In terms of staging I remember being told about one of Zoe Scoglio’s pieces which took place in a rarely used car-racing course on the edge of Melbourne city, which she had choreographed and timed to coincide with a full moon rising. I thought this was an aspect we could work with if we continue to work with the idea of the ‘landscape as a score.’

Also, to more generally emphasising the liberating aspects of removing oneself from Apple-Atomic clock time and being more attentive to circadian rhythms / seasons.

Lichen love

Some basic lichen info, for those of you new to this wonderful world!

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichen
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichen

http://www.ohiomosslichen.org/Lichenology-101.pdf

Here some details on human uses of lichen in different places
https://www.earthlife.net/lichens/intro.html

Bibliographical Database Of The Human Uses Of Lichens
http://www.lichen.com/usetype.html

Artist introducing Spanish lichen to Nida, on foam blog
https://fo.am/blog/2013/11/23/assisted-migration/

https://books.google.lt/books?id=-prNplgZg_MC&pg=PA19&lpg=PA19&dq=lithuania+lichen+extinct&source=bl&ots=rC_zLMQkKQ&sig=N11DRoqBzQWuYvYqfWAH5crGRYY&hl=lt&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjx5u6e9JvbAhWGBSwKHRaiC7sQ6AEIaTAM#v=onepage&q=lithuania%20lichen%20extinct&f=false

Lichen study relating to cormorants (could not DWNLOAD)
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/268981894_Pine_forest_lichens_under_eutrophication_generated_by_a_great_cormorant_colony

Not very reliable
https://www.homeopathyschool.com/the-school/provings/reindeer-moss/

Lichens collected radioactivity after Chernobyl in Lithuania
https://books.google.lt/books?id=EH3LBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA106&lpg=PA106&dq=chernobyl+lichen+lithuania&source=bl&ots=KeZLWoMnIi&sig=nlBHA3tFLYhX5apFxm8Y6ozxbiw&hl=lt&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjjv-zwu6vbAhUDApoKHcgbD044ChDoAQhPMAY#v=onepage&q&f=false

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symbiosis_in_lichens

RARE PLANT SPECIES IN CURONIAN SPIT THREATENED BY PORT ACTIVITIES & the big sea ferries

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tripolium_pannonicum

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysimachia_maritima

A kind of arrowgrass

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triglochin_maritima

 

https://www.sodininkyste.lt/baltijine-stokle-cakile-baltica/

https://www.google.ro/search?q=baltijin%C4%97+stokl%C4%97&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj3876YupHbAhUB3iwKHdiICBcQsAQILQ&biw=1237&bih=655&dpr=2#imgdii=xDTuWKjvtN03XM:&imgrc=j3qgDMVI8SoaFM:

 

http://samogitia.mch.mii.lt/LANKYTINOS_VIETOS/nerija.en.htm

 

http://www.unesco.lt/uploads/file/failai_VEIKLA/kultura/Pasaulio_paveldas%20Lietuvoje/nerija_dok/curonian_spit_nomination_EN.pdf

 

https://content.sciendo.com/view/journals/botlit/22/1/article-p49.xml

 

Atlantic / Baltic Sturgeon

There’s a ton of information out there about the Baltic Sturgeon, one of the great success stories in this era of the sixth mass extinction event – here are a few historical places to start.

https://www.naturalsciences.be/en/news/item/6233

http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/230/0

http://www.helcom.fi/helcom-at-work/projects/completed-projects/sturgeon-rehabilitation-pg/baltic-sea-sturgeon

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/j.1439-0426.1999.tb00221.x

Has some details on first eating of sturgeon/caviar
http://www.fao.org/docrep/006/Y5261E/y5261e06.htm

Article on leaping behaviour
https://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/21/sports/outdoors-the-lofty-mystery-of-why-sturgeon-leap.html

Sturgeon for tomorrow (fishermen + conservationsist)
https://www.sturgeonfortomorrow.org/resources-for-educators.php

Wiki in lithuanian
https://lt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baltijos_a%C5%A1tria%C5%A1nipis_er%C5%A1ketas

misc Lithuanian threatened species

It isn’t just lichen that is threatened in Lithuania these days. Here are some links to other critters also having a hard time of it..

Alien Species on Lithuanian Fund for Nature
http://www.glis.lt/?pid=126

The Noble Beasts of Lithuania
https://www.draugas.org/news/the-noble-beasts-of-lithuania/

Cute european mink now extinct in Lithuania
http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/14018/0

European eel
http://www.iucnredlist.org/details/60344/0

Bats which have some situation in lihtuania (according to red list wiki entry)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbastelle
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pond_bat

IUCN Red List
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IUCN_Red_List
http://www.iucnredlist.org/search (but difficult to use)

List of mammals in Lithuania (including extinct and endangered ones, ie. certain whales, porpoise etc.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mammals_of_Lithuania

Sea holly, a spiky dune plant, aphrodisiac (in UK), supposedly on the Red List here, Eryngium maritimum
http://samogitia.mch.mii.lt/LANKYTINOS_VIETOS/nerija.en.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eryngium_maritimum

Let the sky rain potatoes;
let it thunder to the tune of Green-sleeves,
hail kissing-comfits and snow eringoes [sea-holly],
let there come a tempest of provocation…” (from a Shakespeare play, can’t remember which)

Very detailed study, well nomination for UNESCO list, including some discussion of rare species (fish, mammals, plants, and birds) here (1999 – super out-of-date. Eg. they refer to something as rare but on IUCN its status is a-ok)
http://www.unesco.lt/uploads/file/failai_VEIKLA/kultura/Pasaulio_paveldas%20Lietuvoje/nerija_dok/curonian_spit_nomination_EN.pdf

Better Spectres

Today I read ‘The Fossils and The Bones,’ chapter 3 of Povinelli’s Geontologies (2016). Amazing! Related to the talk she gave at PAF, but more precise, sharply observed. It raises issues that seemed to me to resonate with your enigmatic term ‘Better Spectres,’ which I propose is a more suitable name for this project). She talks about how certain relations between life and non-life give rise to ‘manifestations’ in a world, that Povinelli argues contra to much of Speculative Realist thought which considers non-life as indifferent, is rather ‘intensely interested.’ Therefore when things are manifest or revealed, one is somehow compelled to be attentive, work out what it necessitates and act accordingly. For example, upon the revealing at low tide (karrabing) of a cave that contains a durlg bone:

The durlgmö may have buried itself as a statement of anger or jealousy … To avoid the malevolent effects of such jealousy one had to show one cared by going through the effort of visiting, talking about and interpreting the desires of things. One had to protect them from being unhinged and distended. Thus Bilawag told me not to tell any other white people where the bones were lest they come and dig them up, crate them up, and take them away. (p. 62)

Soon after, following an example of human bones being found in a mangrove Povinelli writes:

White people would be too quick to remove them, too numb to feel a non-human aboutness, towardness, wantness. They would instead rapidly isolate them, disrupting the coordination, orientation and obligation of existents that creates the in sutu. A double alienation threatened—in the sense of property law and the affective attachment of existents. (p. 69)

Povinelli threads through her observations a critique of Meillassoux’s trope of the arche-fossil. It’s good!

I coupled my reading with a trip to the amber museum, to see some of the local fossils. I was struck by some of the ‘jewelry’—amulets, ornaments, etc—of the local people from the neolithic period. The lady at the museum told me they were used for good luck, to ward off evil and also for their healing properties. They were also included in burial offerings.